• Under the weather

    In American English, the word “the” is typically pronounced with a schwa sound “uh” if it is followed by a consonant sound, as in “the weather”. It is pronounced with an “ee” sound, “thee”, when followed by a vowel sound, as in “thee only”. The phrase “under the weather” means to feel ill or sick.

  • Costs an arm and a leg

    In American English, the word “a” is typically pronounced as a schwa sound “uh” if it is followed by a consonant sound, as in “a leg”. It is pronounced “an” when followed by a vowel sound, as in “an arm”. The phrase “costs an arm and a leg” means to be very expensive.

  • Would you like to?

    When a “d” sound connects to a “y” sound, a “j” sound sometimes results. “Would you like to?” can be said “Woujew like to?”

  • Higher education

    The letter “d” is sometimes a “j” sound, as in the word “education”. “Higher education” refers to education beyond high school, specifically that provided by colleges, universities, and professional schools. How important is higher education to you?

  • Where do you live?

    The word “live” is pronounced with a lax “i” sound (also known as a short “i” sound). Many non-native speakers pronounce this with a tense “ee” sound, which makes this word sound like “leave”. If you do this, open your mouth more to say the “i” sound. How do you know it’s not an “ee” […]