• Fun discovery

    Have you ever noticed that American speakers don’t move their mouths much when they talk? We use a lot of neutral vowel sounds and don’t round our lips much. Non-native speakers often sound like they are over-pronouncing. So, use less mouth opening and mouth movements. It will likely reduce your accent! Try it with the […]

  • March wind

    March is known to be a windy month in some areas of the United States. The noun, “wind” has a different vowel sound than the verb, “wind”. Just as a sea “bass” has a different vowel sound than a “bass” drum. Same spelling — pronounced differently! In American English, you can’t be sure how a […]

  • President’s Day

    The letter “s” can sometimes be an “s” sound (e.g., case), and sometimes a “z” sound (e.g., rise).  Common spellings for the “s” sound are the letters “c” and “s” (e.g., peace, bus).  Common spellings for the “z” sound are the letters “z” and “s” (e.g., prize, lose). The word “President’s” has a “z” sound […]

  • Let it snow!

    In some parts of the U.S., February is full of this fluffy, white stuff! In the phrase “let it snow”, the “t” at the end of “let” is pronounced the same as “d”. This is because it links into a vowel sound. When “t” at the end of a word connects to a vowel sound […]

  • Joyous Jan(y)u(w)ary

    The word “January” is spoken as “Jan(y)u(w)ary”. In American English, we link two vowel sounds together with a “w” or “y” sound. The “w” and “y” sounds are in a class of sounds known as “glides”. Some vowel sounds in American English are “glided” vowels. That is, they have a slight “w” or “y” sound […]